COVID-19 Impact on International Higher Education: Studies & Forecasts

Statistik Corona Folgen

Last update: 26 August 2020

Such an astonishing number of analyses and forecasts have already been published on the possible COVID-19 impact on international higher education that it is easy to lose track. Therefore, the DAAD wants to provide a comprehensive overview of the current state of COVID-19 research and expertise in the field of international higher education. Should you know of any other analyses and forecasts that are not mentioned here, we would be pleased to receive a brief note at studien@daad.de.

 

Overview

 

Impact of COVID-19 on HE internationalisation and international academic mobility worldwide 

QS, Educations.com and StudyPortals are currently conducting three international surveys of students and prospective students on the COVID-19 impact on their study or mobility plans.
 

QS Surveys

QS is not only interviewing prospective international students, but also university staff. Results of the QS surveys can be found in these reports published so far:

  • (18.08.2020)
  • (06.07.2020)
  • (22.06.2020)
  • (18.06.2020)
  • (26.05.2020)
  • (08.05.2020)
  • (04.05.2020)
  • (28.04.2020)
  • (02.04.2020) 

The latest QS findings are also repeatedly presented in the form of . The findings of the surveys are also repeatedly summarised on the .

 

Studyportals Surveys and Dashboard

At the end of May, Studyportals published the summary report "" on their surveys of around 800 internationally mobile and non-mobile students worldwide. Earlier publications of the results of the Studyportals surveys can be found here:

  • (April 2020)
  • (Update 3, April 2020)
  • (Update 2, April 2020)
  • (Update 1, April 2020)

However, a certain amount of caution is recommended with regard to the findings, since the number of interviews is very low for an international student survey (about 400, 600 and 800 respondents, respectively).

In April, Studyportals also published the "", which was based on a survey among higher education professionals from 170 institutions worldwide.

Furthermore, Studyportals has opened its to all users free of charge. Here, among other things, the effect of the COVID-19 epidemic on students' search queries to studyportals can be analysed. 

The latest Studyportals findings are also repeatedly presented in the form of . The findings of the surveys are also repeatedly summarised on the .

 

Educations.com Surveys

The results of the Educations.com survey, which is also still ongoing, can be found here:

  • (24.04.2020)
  • (23.03.2020)

As with QS, prospective international students were surveyed, as well as current international students.

 

Bibliometric studies on the COVID-19 impact on international co-publications

Several bibliometric analyses have already been published that examine the extent to which the COVID-19 pandemic has affected international cooperation among academic authors.

A at the end of July shows that international academic cooperation has intensified in the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. Even between the USA and China, there was a significant increase in jointly published journal publications in the field of "Science and Engineering" despite the political tensions between the two countries. The two authors have also published in the online magazine "The Scientist".

A similar finding was reached in . An increase of international co-publications in COVID-19 research between authors from US-American and Chinese research institutions is also shown here. At the same time, the findings prove a comparatively strong concentration of COVID-19 research on a small elite of research nations such as the USA, China, the UK or Japan.

An in early June shows the development of publication patterns in COVID-19 research during the pandemic. Relatively constant shares of bi- and multilateral co-publications can be observed, which account for about 15% (bilateral) and about 10% (multilateral) of all publications on COVID-19, whereas publications without international cooperation of authors account for about 75%.

 

Further cross-national surveys 

BridgeU, a private education provider, published the report . On the basis of two surveys of around 70 student advisors from 41 countries and around 850 students from 83 countries, the report presents forecasts of the COVID-19 impact on worldwide student mobility in the fall and winter semesters of 2020. In the second part, forecasts on further developments in 2021 are also presented, based on data from the BridgeU study planning tool.

The consultancy EY Parthenon has produced a yet unpublished analysis entitled "COVID-19 crisis: Planning towards the new normal - International Higher Education Market", which was reported by Times Higher Education at the end of June (""). The original report was made available to the DAAD on request.

The Erasmus Student Network (ESN) conducted a in March on their experiences in connection with the corona pandemic. A web talk explaining the findings can be accessed

In April, the Australian Educational Consulting Agency IDP interviewed about the consequences of the COVID-19 epidemic on their mobility plans. A summary of the most important findings can be found at the and the .

A further (in the EHEA) or their staff was conducted by the European Association of International Education (EAIE) in February and March 2020. 

ResearchGate has also conducted on its platform and has already published findings.

 

Impact of COVID-19 on HE internationalisation and international academic mobility in specific countries or regions

 

Germany

At the end of July, Sazana Jayadeva from University College London (UCL) published the analysis . It is based on qualitative interviews with Indian master students as well as observational data on online social media used by Indian students to prepare for their stay abroad.

At the beginning of July, the DAAD presented the results of a survey among the International Offices of German universities in its report . 172 of the total of 268 HRK member universities had taken part in the survey. The DAAD also published an with Study Director Jan Kercher (also available in ) and a corresponding . Summaries of the main findings were also published by the and the .

Fintiba, a private consulting agency for international students interested in Germany as a host country, published a in mid-May. This shows: Most students are still very interested in studying in Germany. The study was also reported on by the , among others.

 

UK

In mid-July, the University of Manchester published a that support students in planning their studies abroad. The study focused on the agencies' assessments of the current perception of Great Britain as a possible host country among Chinese students. summarizes the most important results of the survey.

The British Council, DAAD's sister organisation in the UK, has also already conducted a . Similar to the IIE, the focus here is on Chinese students who represent by far the largest group among international students in the UK. The more than 10,000 respondents in this survey included Chinese students who are already studying in the UK as well as Chinese applicants at British universities.

 

Netherlands

Nuffic, the DAAD's sister organisation in the Netherlands, published the English version of the results of a survey of around 650 upper secondary school and vocational students at the beginning of July. The report examines the influence of the Corona crisis on their plans for educational stays abroad: ?

At the end of May, Nuffic had already published the results of a survey of over 900 "potential" international students from non-EU countries: . At the end of July, the results of a follow-up survey of another 1,300 international students were published: .

 

Finland

EDUFI, the DAAD's sister organisation in Finland, published the analysis at the end of June. In this analysis, the COVID-19 impact on the outbound mobility of Finnish students and the inbound mobility of international students in Finland are examined on the basis of higher education statistics (more than 4,000 students in each case).

 

USA

At the beginning of July, the Student Experience in the Research University Consortium (SERU), published the results of a survey on international students' perceptions and concerns during the pandemic. The report gathers responses from over 30,000 students at five large public research universities in the United States. Summaries of the most important findings have been published in , the and .

The Institute for International Education (IIE), DAAD's sister organization in the US, has conducted two "Snapshot Surveys" on the COVID-19 impact at US universities and has published the findings here:

  • (14.05.2020)
  • (06.03.2020)

In addition, the IIE has published in the US and Canada and on international student mobility. You can find the

Diversity Abroad, a US organization that promotes diversity in international student mobility, published a and their perceptions of the COVID-19 pandemic.

 

Australia

The Australian University of Technology Sydney (UTS) published the study in early October. It is based on two surveys of international students in Australia before (August to December 2019) and during (June/July 2020) the COVID-19 pandemic. The most important findings were summarized by , among others.

published the findings of a previously unpublished survey study by Swinburne University in Melbourne on the mobility plans of Chinese students in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of respondents here was only around 1,000. The focus of the survey was the evaluation of Australia as a host country for Chinese students.

The Australian Population Research Institute published the report "" Among other things, the report forecasts that the number of international students in Australia will decline by approximately 50% by mid 2021 due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The most important findings of the report were also .

 

China

In mid-July, the University of Manchester published a that support students in planning their studies abroad. The study focused on the agencies' assessments of the current perception of Great Britain as a possible host country among Chinese students. summarizes the most important results of the survey.

At the beginning of July, University World News presented findings from a previously unpublished . For the study almost 3,000 Chinese students were interviewed about the effect of the corona pandemic on their international mobility.

In mid-June, the private Chinese education service provider New Oriental Overseas Vision Consulting published the findings of a study on the plans and preferences of Chinese students with regard to studying abroad (). However, the survey data was already collected from January to March 2020, i.e. at a time when the COVID-19 pandemic was still in its early stages. Nevertheless, there is already evidence of a shift in the interest of Chinese students from the USA to the UK. The most important findings of the study were also summarized by the .

also published the findings of a previously unpublished survey study by Swinburne University in Melbourne on the mobility plans of Chinese students in times of the COVID-19 pandemic. The number of respondents here was only around 1,000. The focus of the survey was the evaluation of Australia as a host country for Chinese students.

At the end of March already, the Chinese umbrella organisations of educational guidance agencies, BOSSA and COSSA, published the findings of two surveys on the COVID-19 impact on student mobility in China:

 

India and South Asia

At the end of July, Sazana Jayadeva from University College London (UCL) published the analysis . It is based on qualitative interviews with Indian master students as well as observational data on online social media used by Indian students to prepare for their stay abroad.

The private consulting agency Global Reach conducted a previously unpublished survey of around 1,600 prospective international students from South Asia (India, Nepal, Bhutan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka), which was reported in mid-June in The Piew News ("").

There are also several surveys available for Indian (prospective) students on the COVID-19 impact on their plans abroad. QS published the report "" in May, which is based on a survey of current Indian students. Unfortunately, the report does not contain any information on the number of respondents.

In addition to this, there are two surveys of private Consulting Agencies. The central findings of the survey by Yocket are presented , the survey results of Shiksha are available and .

 

Impact of COVID-19 on higher education and students in general

 

Global and cross-national analyses

The private education service provider Pearson published the findings of its at the beginning of August, in the course of which more than 7,000 people aged between 16 and 70 were interviewed worldwide from the beginning to mid-June 2020 on the subject of learning and its future development. The has summarised the six most important trends in higher education.

In mid-July, QS published the report , which contains the results of a worldwide survey of university staff. Unfortunately, the report does not contain any information on the size of the sample or the regional distribution of the respondents.

Within the framework of the Slovenian research project , more than 31,000 students from over 100 countries worldwide were surveyed on the topic "Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Life of Higher Education Students" between 5 May and 15 June 2020. The is based on the and examines the impact of the pandemic on the life, teaching and learning of students, their social contacts and their emotional handling of the crisis situation. The central aim of the CovidSocLab research project is to investigate in particular the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has been less studied to date. For this purpose, in addition to the student survey, bibliometric analyses, a survey of public institutions worldwide and an international comparative analysis of government action in the context of the COVID-19 crisis will be conducted.

At the end of June, Times Higher Education published the findings of its , for which 200 university leaders from a total of 53 countries worldwide were asked about their experiences and assessments of the COVID-19 pandemic. Topics of the survey included the experience with digital teaching, the political support of the respective governments and the effects on university funding, university marketing, university staff and research. The

In May, the International Association of Universities (IAU) published their survey report . The survey analysis is based on replies from administrative staff at 424 HEIs in 109 countries. Results are analysed both at the global level and at the regional level in four regions of the world (Africa, the Americas, Asia & Pacific and Europe). IAU also collects , sorted by different world regions (see tab "Global News"). In mid-August, the IAU also published the report , which includes, for example, national perspectives from the USA, India and Hungary as well as a European perspective on the handling of COVID-19 in international higher education.

The Systemic Risk Centre at the London School of Economics and Political Science published the discussion paper "". The paper attempts to predict the impact of the corona pandemic on societal attitudes and views towards scientists and science itself. Times Higher Education has summarised the .

The Boston College Center for International Higher Education (CIHE) published in early May, focusing on the many challenges relating to the COVID-19 crisis, how it is affecting higher education around the world at the national, institutional, and individual levels, and what some of the future implications may be.

The World Bank maintains a continuously updated , including the number of pupils and students affected in each country.

The UK NARIC research team is also . They also published the report "" in mid-May.

A similar international monitoring project is the (OxCGRT) of the University of Oxford. In contrast to the monitoring projects of the World Bank and UK NARIC, this project does not only look at school or university closures, but also at other government measures in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, such as bans or restrictions on public gatherings, curfews and travel restrictions. From the respective implementation level of the nine types of measures considered, an index value between 0 (no corresponding measures) and 100 (complete implementation of all measures) is calculated for the OxCGRT. However, the index values of all nine . It is particularly helpful here that not only the current status can be viewed, but also the development of the implementation of measures to date can be traced with the help of a slider. The central disadvantage of the OxCGRT is that university closures are not considered as a separate measure or index value, but are considered together with school closures. 

Science Business is running the live blog "", which reports on how the crisis is impacting research and innovation, and what governments, funders, companies, universities, associations and scientists are doing to stop or cope with the pandemic.

Further web publications on crisis management at universities in times of the COVID-19 pandemic are available from the Chronicle of Higher Education and QS:

  • The Chronicle of Higher Education:
  • QS:

Finally, there is also a survey by , for which more than 2,000 leaders in the public and private education sectors worldwide were asked about their assessments of COVID-19 effects (in March). The most important findings of this survey have already been summarised by the .

 

Studies and simulations on university operation under pandemic conditions

In early August, five researchers from the three US universities California Institute of Technology, Middlebury College (Vermont) and Johns Hopkins University published the preprint article . This gives an overview of the very different COVID-19 testing plans among US colleges and universities. A report on the study can also be found at .

Also at the beginning of August, researchers at Siena College in the US published the results of a simulation study of university teaching in compliance with the COVID-19 distance rules on .

At the end of July, researchers from Harvard and Yale University published the simulation study . A summary of the most important findings of the study has been published by .

In mid-July, a biology professor from the Georgia Institute of Technology in the US presented his calculations on the number of possible deaths in the event of a complete reopening of the university in the fall semester. The most important results and implications of these calculations can also be found on .

In mid-June, researchers at Cornell University in the US published a that concluded that more students may be infected with COVID-19 during an online semester than during an in-person semester. The reason for this is that the university can better control an outbreak by continuous testing on site.

At the beginning of June, two US professors published a working paper containing . summarizes the most important findings of the simulation study.

In another article, also reports on another simulation study as well as an experiment that deals with the concrete implementation of social distancing measures in the context of university teaching. The California Institute of Technology has used 3D simulations to calculate which . A professor at Salve Regina University investigated the in a teaching experiment. Inside Higher Ed contrasts his very negative results with the contrary assessment of a professor at Grand Valley State University, who refers in particular to so-called "", as they are used, for example, by experts of the Center for Teaching at Vanderbilt University.

 

Studies and findings on gender-specific corona effects for scientists

Various scientific or bibliometric analyses of gender-specific COVID-19 impact on the publication output of scientists have already been published.  The findings of these studies to date indicate very uniformly that the scientific publication output of women is much more negatively influenced by the COVID-19 pandemic than that of men:

  • Peterson Gabster et al.: (18.06.2020)
  • Vincent-Lamarre et al: (19.05.2020)
  • Andersen et al: (13.05.2020)
  • Frederickson: (11.05.2020)
  • Amano-Patiño et al: (02.05.2020)
  • Dolan/Lawless: It Takes a Submission: (20.04.2020)

The research team led by Prof. Philippe Vincent-Lamarre from the University of Montréal in Canada and Indiana University in the US also runs the ongoing monitoring project , which also allows interactive creation of own data analyses.

In addition, 35 women scientists published the joint article on Times Higher Education in mid-May. At the end of June, Times Higher Education also published the findings of a specially commissioned bibliometric analysis on gender-specific consequences for the publication output of women scientists, again with clear findings: . Further media contributions, some of which were based on small surveys or queries to scientific journals, were published in , , and the .

 

Web talks and townhalls on COVID-19 and higher education

  • QS:
    • (03.06.2020)
    • (23.04.2020)
    • (14.04.2020)
    • (26.03.2020)
  • Studyportals:
    • (26.05.2020)
    • (28.04.2020)
    • (16.04.2020)
    • (31.03.2020)
  • ICEF:
    • (08.07.2020)
    • (04.06.2020)
    • (06.05.2020)
  • Web talk series on the , hosted by the International Association of Universities (IAU)
    • The Future of Higher Education: Perspectives on Reopening Strategies at Universites Around The World (07.07.2020)
    • The Future of Higher Education: Internationalization Strategies Post-COVID-19 (30.06.2020)
    • The Future of Higher Education: COVID-19 Impact on Higher Education Around The World (09.06.2020)
  • Web talks series , hosted by UC Davis
    • (25.06.2020)
    • (18.06.2020)
  • :
    • Dialogue #6 - COVID-19 Impact in Africa: Opportunities for Partnership and Engagement (08.07.2020)
    • Dialogue #5 - Coping with Mental Health Impacts of COVID-19 in Higher Education: Responses and Lessons Learned (24.06.2020)
    • Dialogue #4 - The economic, food security, and livelihood impacts of COVID-19 in Africa: Lessons learned and policy responses (10.06.2020)
    • Dialogue #3 - Educational Access at Higher Education Institutions in the Age of COVID-19 (27.05.2020)
    • Dialogue #2 - Global and Continental Partnerships and Collaboration in Higher Education Post COVID-19 (13.05.2020)
    • Dialogue #1 - COVID-19 Pandemic: Responses and lessons learned from African universities (29.04.2020)
    • Policy & Advocacy in the Time of COVID-19: What You Can Do to Support International Education (29.04.2020)
    • Public Health and International Education – What’s now and what’s next (14.04.2020)
    • Responding to a Worldwide Health Crisis and Travel Restrictions (20.02.2020)
    • (18.06.2020)
    • (28.05.2020)
    • (21.05.2020)
    • COVID-19 Crisis and the Impact on International Populations in Higher Education and Beyond (12.05.2020)
    • COVID-19 Crisis and the Impact on Undocumented/DACA Students and Their Families: What Campus Leaders Need to Know (27.04.2020)
    • COVID-19 Briefing: How International & Immigrant Populations in Higher Education are Impacted, What Campuses Leaders Need to Know (27.03.2020)
  • JIO web talk "" by Dr. Allan Goodman & Dr. Francisco Marmalejo (14.05.2020)
  • Web talks by Carnegie Dartlet, focussing
  • Science Business web talk (22.04.2020)
  • Intead townhall (16.03.2020)
  • Chronicle of Higher Education web talk  (15.07.2020)
  • Web talk  hosted by Tohoku University (10.07.2020)

 

Europe

In mid-June, the European University Foundation launched an , in which European universities can indicate whether they will accept exchange students in the winter semester 2020/21 and whether they offer online courses. Universities can enter their data via the .

 

UK

In mid-July, reported on a survey by the National Union of Students (NUS) among approximately 1,000 students in Great Britain and their assessments of possible teaching conditions in the winter semester.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies, a British think tank, published the analysis at the beginning of July, which contains an assessment of the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for British universities and a forecast of possible university failures. and have reported on the most important findings, and a critical comment on the analysis can be found on the .

The private consulting agency London Economics has already conducted two studies on corona effects for British universities on behalf of the British University and Colleges Union (UCU). In April, the report was published, which attempts to assess the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for universities. The were summarized by WONKHE and also .

In May, another study was published, based on a survey of about 500 higher education applicants, which examines the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic on their study plans: .

The Universities and Colleges Admissions Service (UCAS) regularly publishes up-to-date data on the current number of applications, most recently at the . In April, UCAS also published the results of a to assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their study plans. Two contributions by Clare Marchant and Sander Kristel, Chief Executive and Chief Operations Officer of UCAS respectively, were also published on the WONKHE blog in and .

 

Netherlands

In mid-May The Association of Universities in the Netherlands (VSNU) published the report "". The VSNU also maintains a continuously updated overview with .

 

USA

Three researchers from the University of Southern California published the results of an analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on students in the US on in early August. The basis was data from the .

The two private consulting agencies Tyton Partners and Digital Promises published the results of two surveys on online teaching in the US spring semester at the beginning of July. For the first survey, with the switch to online teaching, for the other . Inside Higher Ed summarizes the main findings of both surveys.

The Chronicle of Higher Education maintains a continuously updated "", which also includes a graphic overview of these plans.

The Art & Science Group, a private consulting agency in the field of higher education, has conducted three surveys among high school leavers since March to examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on their study plans. The most recent of these surveys was conducted at the and a summary of the most important findings has been published in the . The most important findings of the can also be read at the . The results from April can be found

Two further surveys of high school leavers were published in April by the private educational consulting agencies Brian Communications () and Encoura ().

The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center published an updated version of its at the end of June. The data show that the COVID-19 pandemic has apparently not yet had a major impact on student enrollment in the spring semester, regardless of student demographics or the type of institution. The results can be individually analyzed and filtered in a dynamic dashboard. Inside Higher Ed has summarized the .

The American Council on Education (ACE), a higher education association that represents the interests of over 1,700 US universities and colleges, has already conducted three surveys on COVID-19 effects among US university presidents. The number of respondents was 192 (April survey), 310 (May survey), 300 (June survey) and 270 (July survey).

  • (30.07.2020)
  • (25.06.2020)
  • (21.05.2020)
  • (22.04.2020)

Inside Higher Ed has also already conducted three surveys on the COVID-19 impact among US university presidents. However, the number of respondents is lower than in the ACE surveys, with 97 (June survey), 172 (March survey) and 187 (April survey).

  • (29.06.2020)
  • (27.04.2020)
  • (27.03.2020)

All three surveys were also presented in a webcast, whose recordings and presentation slides are available , and .

At the end of July, Inside Higher Ed also published the findings of the annual , which focuses on the possible financial impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on US universities. A webcast on the results of the survey can be accessed .

Carnegie Dartlet, a private college marketing agency, provides an on the COVID-19 impact on the U.S. college world.

In mid-May, the Wall Street Journal made a video contribution on the question . To better understand the challenges facing U.S. colleges and universities, the WSJ spoke with administrators, students, and a higher education futurist.

In April, the private survey agency Bay View Analytics conducted a Snapshot Poll of over 800 employees of over 600 US universities . The survey was reported by , among others.

In March, the US-American Art & Science Group also interviewed nearly 500 prospective college students in the US on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on their study plans. The most important findings can be found in the .

McKinsey regularly publishes articles on US university governance in times of COVID-19:

  • (01.06.2020)
  • (21.05.2020)
  • (30.04.2020)
  • (23.04.2020)
  • (03.04.2020)
  • (30.03.2020)

 

Canada

The Canadian university magazine "University Affairs" offers a continuously updated overview with .

ICEF also held a web talk in early June on "", now available as a video.

 

Australia

The University of Technology Sydney published the ten-part podcast "The New Social Contract" between 3 May and 1 July, which highlights various aspects of the COVID-19 impact on Australian universities. The episodes are 30 to 60 minutes long and are all available .

A study published in late June by the Centre for the Study of Higher Education at the University of Melbourne calculates the financial consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for individual Australian universities: "". A summary of the most important findings of the study can be found in the .

 

Latin America

The Center for Latin American & Latino Studies (CLALS) at the American University in Washington, DC, published a in early June. The study is based on a survey of university staff at more than 50 universities in Latin America. The most important findings of the study were also published on the CLALS blog.

 

Expert views and forecasts on COVID-19 and higher education

In recent months, numerous expert views and forecasts on the consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for the international higher education world have been published on the relevant media outlets and blogs. In general, we would like to draw your attention once again to the and the , which both contain numerous articles on the COVID-19 pandemic and its impact on international higher education. In addition, especially , , and the (HEPI) constantly publish relevant expert articles and forecasts.In the following you will find a collection of particularly relevant articles from recent weeks and months.

 

University World News

  • (van Rooijen , 04.07.2020)
  • (Benhayoun, 04.07.2020)
  • (Mitchell, 03.07.2020)
  • (Mitchell, 26.06.2020)
  • (Marmolejo, 13.06.2020)
  • (Marinoni/de Wit, 08.06.2020)
  • (Hudzik, 06.06.2020)
  • (Aarts, 06.06.2020)
  • (MacGregor, 06.06.2020)
  • (Edersheim, 06.06.2020)
  • (Chao Jr, 03.06.2020)
  • (de Wit, 23.05.2020)
  • (Montgomery, 16.05.2020)
  • (Leask/Green, 02.05.2020)
  • (Altbach/de Wit, 02.05.2020)
  • (Hudzik, 02.05.2020)
  • (Burquel/Busch, 25.04.2020):
  • (White/Lee, 18.04.2020) 
  • (Brown/Salmi, 18.04.2020) 
  • (Stückelberger, 11.04.2020)
  • (Martel/Rumbley, 09.04.2020) 
  • (Altbach/de Wit, 04.04.2020) 
  • (Odgen/Streitwieser/ van Mol, 04.04.2020) 
  • (Atherton, 04.04.2020) 
  • (Dennis, 28.03.2020) 
  • (Mitchell, 26.03.2020) 
  • (Mitchell, 26.03.2020) 
  • (Altbach/de Wit, 15.03.2020) 

 

Times Higher Education

  • (Ghantous, 02.07.2020)
  • (LeFevre, 30.06.2020)
  • (Bothwell, 10.06.2020)
  • (Ross, 04.06.2020)
  • (Garcia, 03.06.2020)
  • (Bothwell, 02.06.2020)
  • (Lorber/Prem, 19.05.2020)
  • (Devinney/Dowling, 14.05.2020)
  • (Mouzughi, 06.05.2020)
  • (Ross, 15.04.2020) 
  • (Lerman/Sen, 09.04.2020) 
  • (Hillman, 02.04.2020) 
  • (Bothwell, 26.03.2020) 
  • (Marginson, 26.03.2020) 
  • (Smith, 26.03.2020) 

 

WONKHE

  • (14.07.2020)
  • (05.07.2020)
  • (25.06.2020)
  • (25.06.2020)
  • (22.06.2020)
  • (22.06.2020)
  • (22.06.2020)
  • (21.06.2020)
  • (19.06.2020)
  • (18.06.2020)
  • (18.06.2020)
  • (02.06.2020)
  •  (12.05.2020)
  •  (06.05.2020)

 

HEPI's Blog

  • (22.04.2020) 
  • (09.04.2020) 
  • (08.04.2020) 
  • (30.03.2020) 
  • (23.03.2020) 

 

Other, mixed sources

  • Inside Higher Ed (12.07.2020):
  • New York Times (08.07.2020): 
  • MSM (01.07.2020)
  • Medium.com: (29.06.2020)
  • Higher Education Today (29.06.2020): 
  • World Education News + Reviews (12.05.2020):
  • ICEF Monitor (06.05.2020): 
  • The PIE News (24.04.2020):
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education (15.04.2020):
  • ICEF Monitor (15.04.2020):  
  • Inside Higher Ed (14.04.2020):  
  • Inside Higher Eduation (14.04.2020):  
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education (13.04.2020):  
  • Forbes (13.04.2020):  
  • Medium.com (09.04.2020):  
  • Worlds of Education (09.04.2020):  
  • ICEF Monitor (01.04.2020):  
  • Medium.com (26.03.2020):
  • ZDNet (Dignan, 22.03.2020):